Introduction and Welcome

Welcome to All Things Bright and Beautiful. If you are new to this site, I would recommend that you read my very first entry - which is an introduction and welcome to this blog. You can view it here

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Robert Bateman - Tiger Portrait, Franz Joseph Haydn - Trumpet Concerto in D, and Phillis Wheatley - Recollection

As with so many of the animals Robert Bateman painted he has more than one wonderful painting to choose from.  I liked this particular one.
Tiger Portrait - © Robert Bateman

Franz Joseph Haydn Trumpet Concerto in D and if you want to listen to more of Haydn's wonderful  music as background music - here is a link to The Best of Haydn .



Phillis Wheatley's poem today is about memory, a gift or a curse depending on the life we live.... (Mneme is the Greek muse of memory, there were nine muses).

              Recollection


MNEME* begin. Inspire, ye sacred nine,
Your vent'rous Afric in her great design.
Mneme, immortal pow'r, I trace thy spring:
Assist my strains, while I thy glories sing:
The acts of long departed years, by thee
Recover'd, in due order rang'd we see:
Thy pow'r the long-forgotten calls from night,
That sweetly plays before the fancy's sight.
Mneme in our nocturnal visions pours
The ample treasure of her secret stores;
Swift from above the wings her silent flight
Through Phoebe's realms, fair regent of the night;
And, in her pomp of images display'd,
To the high-raptur'd poet gives her aid,
Through the unbounded regions of the mind,
Diffusing light celestial and refin'd.
The heav'nly phantom paints the actions done
By ev'ry tribe beneath the rolling sun.
Mneme, enthron'd within the human breast,
Has vice condemn'd, and ev'ry virtue blest.
How sweet the sound when we her plaudit hear?
Sweeter than music to the ravish'd ear,
Sweeter than Maro's entertaining strains
Resounding through the groves, and hills, and plains.
But how is Mneme dreaded by the race,
Who scorn her warnings and despise her grace?
By her unveil'd each horrid crime appears,
Her awful hand a cup of wormwood bears.
Days, years mispent, O what a hell of woe!
Hers the worst tortures that our souls can know.
Now eighteen years their destin'd course have run,
In fast succession round the central sun.
How did the follies of that period pass
Unnotic'd, but behold them writ in brass!
In Recollection see them fresh return,
And sure 'tis mine to be asham'd, and mourn.
O Virtue, smiling in immortal green,
Do thou exert thy pow'r, and change the scene;
Be thine employ to guide my future days,
And mine to pay the tribute of my praise.
Of Recollection such the pow'r enthron'd
In ev'ry breast, and thus her pow'r is own'd.
The wretch, who dar'd the vengeance of the skies,
At last awakes in horror and surprise,
By her alarm'd, he sees impending fate,
He howls in anguish, and repents too late.
But O! what peace, what joys are hers t' impart
To ev'ry holy, ev'ry upright heart!
Thrice blest the man, who, in her sacred shrine,
Feels himself shelter'd from the wrath divine! 


* In Greek mythology the muse of memory

Thursday, July 17, 2014

Robert Bateman - Shrike Pair and Hawthorne, Franz Joseph Haydn - Symphony No. 45 in F-sharp minor "Farewell", Phillis Wheatley - An Hymn to the Evening

Robert Bateman has so many wonderful bird paintings - you may want to look up Google Images - Robert Bateman - Birds I liked the foliage and berries as well as the birds in this painting.
Shrike Pair and Hawthorne - © Robert Bateman
Here is a link to the Picassa Web Album of Robert Bateman Paintings  that we are using this season.  The Robert Bateman Foundation has graciously granted us permission to copy them for educational use.

Today's piece by Franz Joseph Haydn is Symphony No. 45 in F-sharp minor "Farewell"  It is an intense but beautiful piece of music.  And a link here to about two hours of The "Best" of Haydn  It actually starts with this week's piece of music.


Phillis Wheatley - An Hymn to the Evening

SOON as the sun forsook the eastern main
The pealing thunder shook the heav'nly plain;
Majestic grandeur! From the zephyr's* wing,
Exhales the incense of the blooming spring.
Soft purl the streams, the birds renew their notes,
And through the air their mingled music floats.
Through all the heav'ns what beauteous dies are spread!
But the west glories in the deepest red:
So may our breasts with ev'ry virtue glow,
The living temples of our God below!
Fill'd with the praise of him who gives the light,
And draws the sable curtains of the night,
Let placid slumbers sooth each weary mind,
At morn to wake more heav'nly, more refin'd;
So shall the labours of the day begin
More pure, more guarded from the snares of sin.
Night's leaden sceptre seals my drowsy eyes,
Then cease, my song, till fair Aurora* rise.

*Zephyr - A light wind or west wind

*Aurora - Roman goddess of the dawn



Thursday, July 10, 2014

Robert Bateman - Chipmunk, Franz Joseph Haydn - Suprise Symphony, Phillis Wheatley - On the Death of A Young Lady of Five Years of Age

Robert Bateman obviously loved nature.  This cute little creature is captured so well you think if you move he'll dash off the page.
© Robert Bateman
 A reader kindly let me know that the link to my Picassa Web Album of Robert Bateman Paintings wasn't coming up.  I had not realized that I needed to set it to a public viewer setting, so I am sorry to any of you who tried earlier and found it inaccessible it should be accessible now.  Also the Robert Bateman foundation has graciously given copies of the paintings we are using in a larger format with more pixels so they should be better for printing for your educational use.  Sorry to any of you who have previously tried and had trouble and thank you to the reader who let me know the difficulties.  

Today's piece by Franz Joseph Haydn is fun.  It's called the Surprise Symphony. Following is a quote from Wikipedia, "Haydn's music contains many jokes, and the Surprise Symphony includes probably the most famous of all: a sudden fortissimo chord at the end of the otherwise piano opening theme in the variation-form second movement. The music then returns to its original quiet dynamic, as if nothing had happened, and the ensuing variations do not repeat the joke." - children enjoy listening for the "surprise".  Hadyn's Suprise Symphony.


Our Poem by Phillis Wheatley 



On The Death Of A Young Lady Of Five Years Of Age


FROM dark abodes to fair etherial light
Th' enraptur'd innocent has wing'd her flight;
 
On the kind bosom of eternal love
She finds unknown beatitude above.
This known, ye parents, nor her loss deplore,
She feels the iron hand of pain no more;
The dispensations of unerring grace,
Should turn your sorrows into grateful praise;
Let then no tears for her henceforward flow,
No more distress'd in our dark vale below,
Her morning sun, which rose divinely bright,
Was quickly mantled with the gloom of night;
But hear in heav'n's blest bow'rs your Nancy fair,
And learn to imitate her language there.
"Thou, Lord, whom I behold with glory crown'd,
"By what sweet name, and in what tuneful sound
"Wilt thou be prais'd? Seraphic pow'rs are faint
"Infinite love and majesty to paint.
"To thee let all their graceful voices raise,
"And saints and angels join their songs of praise."
Perfect in bliss she from her heav'nly home
Looks down, and smiling beckons you to come;
Why then, fond parents, why these fruitless groans?
Restrain your tears, and cease your plaintive moans.
Freed from a world of sin, and snares, and pain,
Why would you wish your daughter back again?
No--bow resign'd. Let hope your grief control,
And check the rising tumult of the soul.
Calm in the prosperous, and adverse day,
Adore the God who gives and takes away;
Eye him in all, his holy name revere,
Upright your actions, and your hearts sincere,
Till having sail'd through life's tempestuous sea,
And from its rocks, and boist'rous billows free,
Yourselves, safe landed on the blissful shore,
Shall join your happy babe to part no more.
 

Thursday, July 3, 2014

Robert Bateman - Daylilies and Dragonflies


Daylilies and Dragonflies by Robert Bateman is such a fun painting for summer!  His work is so realistic it is better than a photograph. 
© Robert Bateman


A reader kindly let me know that the link to my Picassa Web Album of Robert Bateman Paintings wasn't coming up.  I had not realized that I needed to set it to a public viewer setting, so I am sorry to any of you who tried earlier and found it inaccessible it should be accessible now.  Also the Robert Bateman foundation has graciously given copies of the paintings we are using in a larger format with more pixels so they should be better for printing for your educational use.  Sorry to any of you who have previously tried and had trouble and thank you to the reader who let me know the difficulties. 

A lively happy piece of music today by Franz Joseph Haydn, "Sunrise"



Our poem today by Phillis Wheatley goes nicely with our music -

An Hymn To The Morning

ATTEND my lays, ye ever honour'd nine,
Assist my labours, and my strains refine;
In smoothest numbers pour the notes along,
For bright Aurora now demands my song.
Aurora hail, and all the thousand dies,
Which deck thy progress through the vaulted skies:
The morn awakes, and wide extends her rays,
On ev'ry leaf the gentle zephyr plays;
Harmonious lays the feather'd race resume,
Dart the bright eye, and shake the painted plume.
Ye shady groves, your verdant gloom display
To shield your poet from the burning day:
Calliope awake the sacred lyre,
While thy fair sisters fan the pleasing fire:
The bow'rs, the gales, the variegated skies
In all their pleasures in my bosom rise.
See in the east th' illustrious king of day!
His rising radiance drives the shades away--
But Oh! I feel his fervid beams too strong,
And scarce begun, concludes th' abortive song.




Thursday, June 26, 2014

Robert Bateman - Majesty on the Wing-Bald Eagle,

Robert Bateman has many wonderful paintings of Bald Eagles.  I hope you enjoy this lovely one.  I like how you can see all his feathers in action.   
Majesty on the Wing - © Robert Bateman


* A reader pointed out that the following link was not working.  I reset it for public viewing so hopefully it will work for you now.  Sorry for any inconvenience this may have caused anyone....  
 Following is a link to our  Picassa Web Album of Robert Bateman Paintings.  These will be the paintings we will be viewing this summer.  Though they are copyrighted we have been given permission to copy them for educational use.  
Books of paintings by Robert Bateman 
 
This is the last week I will be featuring The Creation oratorio by Franz Joseph Haydn of course you can take as long as you'd like or come back to it at any time, but next week we will move on to more of his music. I found this full length version of it if you would like to listen to it in it's entirety while you work on other projects: The Creation in English


Part 1 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8omYmytYvlo&feature=related
Part 2 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S03cwGuw43s&feature=related  there are two places with nude artwork that you may want to minimize the screen for and just listen, from 04:28-05:15 and 06:33-06:48.  
Part 3 http://www.youtube.com/watch?NR=1&feature=endscreen&v=JYvdjGzlNYc
Part 4 http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=endscreen&NR=1&v=ucr4VikNxQw
Part 5 http://www.youtube.com/watch?NR=1&feature=endscreen&v=WFs18ayIg5Y
Part 6 http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=endscreen&NR=1&v=-ul_KX2AV1U
Part 7 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8fQ0_HnJYuc
Part 8 http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=endscreen&NR=1&v=JZFeA-INyV4 (Part 8 does include lots of nude artwork depicting Adam and Eve from about 00:32-04:15. You may want to minimize the screen and just listen.  Also footage of a Lion attacking a Wildebeast which might be too graphic for young or sensitive children - you could minimize when the lions start stalking at about 07:45 and continue to listen until this part is past- about 08:12).
Part 9 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pRlL_0rTgsM&feature=related
Part 10 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zKIYumIqvBQ&feature=related  (01:55-02:12 includes a piece of artwork of a person without clothes)
Part 11 http://www.youtube.com/watch?NR=1&feature=endscreen&v=5lhp86YCQUQ (Part 11 from minute 06:52-08:05 focuses on a drawing of Adam and Eve without clothes - if this bothers you, just minimize for that minute....)
Part 12 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vJXb2H4J268&feature=related



 I wasn't able to find who S. M. the young African painter was - if any of you have information, please let us know.  It would be fun to see some of his work.  Phillis Wheatley brings it alive in words....

To S. M. A Young African Painter, On Seeing His Works

By Phillis Wheatley
         TO show the lab’ring bosom’s deep intent,

And thought in living characters to paint,

When first thy pencil did those beauties give,

And breathing figures learnt from thee to live,

How did those prospects give my soul delight,

A new creation rushing on my sight?

Still, wond’rous youth! each noble path pursue,

On deathless glories fix thine ardent view:

Still may the painter’s and the poet’s fire

To aid thy pencil, and thy verse conspire!

And may the charms of each seraphic theme

Conduct thy footsteps to immortal fame!

High to the blissful wonders of the skies

Elate thy soul, and raise thy wishful eyes.

Thrice happy, when exalted to survey

That splendid city, crown’d with endless day,

Whose twice six gates on radiant hinges ring:

Celestial Salem blooms in endless spring.

Calm and serene thy moments glide along,

And may the muse inspire each future song!

Still, with the sweets of contemplation bless’d,

May peace with balmy wings your soul invest!

But when these shades of time are chas’d away,

And darkness ends in everlasting day,

On what seraphic pinions shall we move,

And view the landscapes in the realms above?

There shall thy tongue in heav’nly murmurs flow,

And there my muse with heav’nly transport glow:

No more to tell of Damon’s tender sighs,

Or rising radiance of Aurora’s eyes,

For nobler themes demand a nobler strain,

And purer language on th’ ethereal plain.

Cease, gentle muse! the solemn gloom of night

Now seals the fair creation from my sight.
 
Seraphs are celestial beings having three pairs of wings.


se·raph·ic
səˈrafik/
adjective
adjective: seraphic - characteristic of or resembling a seraph or seraphim.  Synonyms:  blissful, beatific, sublime, rapturous, ecstatic, joyful, rapt.
"Aurora" - Goddess of the Dawn, Wikipedia on Aurora in mythology

Thursday, June 19, 2014

Robert Bateman - Above the Rapids


Even though the grizzly bear in this painting by Robert Bateman is in the background - he stays the center of our attention.  Love those detailed rocks and the reflective water even in the mist and of course the seagulls in motion.

Above the Rapids - © Robert Bateman


Following is a link to our  Picassa Web Album of Robert Bateman Paintings. These will be the paintings we will be viewing this summer.  Though they are copyrighted we have been given permission to copy them for educational use.  
Books of paintings by Robert Bateman 
 
Summer is busy - I hope you're finding time to squeeze in a few of these wonderful parts of the Creation oratorio by Franz Joseph Haydn   Part 1 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8omYmytYvlo&feature=related
Part 2 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S03cwGuw43s&feature=related  there are two places with nude artwork that you may want to minimize the screen for and just listen, from 04:28-05:15 and 06:33-06:48.  
Part 3 http://www.youtube.com/watch?NR=1&feature=endscreen&v=JYvdjGzlNYc
Part 4 http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=endscreen&NR=1&v=ucr4VikNxQw
Part 5 http://www.youtube.com/watch?NR=1&feature=endscreen&v=WFs18ayIg5Y
Part 6 http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=endscreen&NR=1&v=-ul_KX2AV1U
Part 7 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8fQ0_HnJYuc
Part 8 http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=endscreen&NR=1&v=JZFeA-INyV4 (Part 8 does include lots of nude artwork depicting Adam and Eve from about 00:32-04:15. You may want to minimize the screen and just listen.  Also footage of a Lion attacking a Wildebeast which might be too graphic for young or sensitive children - you could minimize when the lions start stalking at about 07:45 and continue to listen until this part is past- about 08:12).
Part 9 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pRlL_0rTgsM&feature=related
Part 10 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zKIYumIqvBQ&feature=related  (01:55-02:12 includes a piece of artwork of a person without clothes)
Part 11 http://www.youtube.com/watch?NR=1&feature=endscreen&v=5lhp86YCQUQ (Part 11 from minute 06:52-08:05 focuses on a drawing of Adam and Eve without clothes - if this bothers you, just minimize for that minute....)
Part 12 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vJXb2H4J268&feature=related




On Imagination

By Phillis Wheatley
Thy various works, imperial queen, we see,
    How bright their forms! how deck'd with pomp by thee!
Thy wond'rous acts in beauteous order stand,
And all attest how potent is thine hand.


    From Helicon's refulgent heights attend,
Ye sacred choir, and my attempts befriend:
To tell her glories with a faithful tongue,
Ye blooming graces, triumph in my song.


    Now here, now there, the roving Fancy flies,
Till some lov'd object strikes her wand'ring eyes,
Whose silken fetters all the senses bind,
And soft captivity involves the mind.


    Imagination! who can sing thy force?
Or who describe the swiftness of thy course?
Soaring through air to find the bright abode,
Th' empyreal palace of the thund'ring God,
We on thy pinions can surpass the wind,
And leave the rolling universe behind:
From star to star the mental optics rove,
Measure the skies, and range the realms above.
There in one view we grasp the mighty whole,
Or with new worlds amaze th' unbounded soul.


    Though Winter frowns to Fancy's raptur'd eyes
The fields may flourish, and gay scenes arise;
The frozen deeps may break their iron bands,
And bid their waters murmur o'er the sands.
Fair Flora may resume her fragrant reign,
And with her flow'ry riches deck the plain;
Sylvanus may diffuse his honours round,
And all the forest may with leaves be crown'd:
Show'rs may descend, and dews their gems disclose,
And nectar sparkle on the blooming rose.


    Such is thy pow'r, nor are thine orders vain,
O thou the leader of the mental train:
In full perfection all thy works are wrought,
And thine the sceptre o'er the realms of thought.
Before thy throne the subject-passions bow,
Of subject-passions sov'reign ruler thou;
At thy command joy rushes on the heart,
And through the glowing veins the spirits dart.


    Fancy might now her silken pinions try
To rise from earth, and sweep th' expanse on high:
From Tithon's bed now might Aurora rise,
Her cheeks all glowing with celestial dies,
While a pure stream of light o'erflows the skies.
The monarch of the day I might behold,
And all the mountains tipt with radiant gold,
But I reluctant leave the pleasing views,
Which Fancy dresses to delight the Muse;
Winter austere forbids me to aspire,
And northern tempests damp the rising fire;
They chill the tides of Fancy's flowing sea,
Cease then, my song, cease the unequal lay.

Most of the following were unknown to me so I looked them up - 

"Helicon" - (this from Wikipedia)"Helicon was briefly mentioned in some stories of Orpheus. After he was killed by some of Dionysus' followers, the women tried to wash their hands clean of the blood spilt. The river sank itself so as not to become tainted with the murdered man's blood."

"Sylvanus" - (also from Wikipedia) "Silvanus (Latin: "of the woods") was a Roman tutelary deity of woods and fields. As protector of forests (sylvestris deus), he especially presided over plantations and delighted in trees growing wild. He is also described as a god watching over the fields and husbandmen, protecting in particular the boundaries of fields.

"Tithon" - (Wikipedia) "Eos, the Goddess of Dawn, took Tithon (Tithonus), son of Laomedon to be her lover. She asked Zeus if Tithonus could be made immortal, but forgot to ask for eternal youthfulness as well. Tithonus lived forever but grew more ancient and wrinkled, eventually turning into a grasshopper." and more here.  Shakespeare makes mention of Tithon's bed in a couple of his plays. 

 "Empyreal" - Belonging to or deriving from heaven. 

"Flora"(Wikipedia) is the plant life occurring in a particular region or time, generally the naturally occurring or indigenousnative plant life. The corresponding term for animal life is fauna.

Thursday, June 12, 2014

Robert Bateman - Mossy Branches - Spotted Owl,

Robert Bateman's "Mossy Branches - Spotted Owl" --Beautiful work! This link allows you to zoom in to see the details of this painting. 
Mossy Branches - Spotted Owl, © Robert Bateman



Following is a link to our   Picassa Web Album of Robert Bateman Paintings. These will be the paintings we will be viewing this summer.  Though they are copyrighted we have been given permission to copy them for educational use.  

Books of paintings by Robert Bateman 

Continuing with "The Creation" oratorio by Franz Joseph Haydn -  
Part 1 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8omYmytYvlo&feature=related
Part 2 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S03cwGuw43s&feature=related  there are two places with nude artwork that you may want to minimize the screen for and just listen, from 04:28-05:15 and 06:33-06:48.  
Part 3 http://www.youtube.com/watch?NR=1&feature=endscreen&v=JYvdjGzlNYc
Part 4 http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=endscreen&NR=1&v=ucr4VikNxQw
Part 5 http://www.youtube.com/watch?NR=1&feature=endscreen&v=WFs18ayIg5Y
Part 6 http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=endscreen&NR=1&v=-ul_KX2AV1U
Part 7 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8fQ0_HnJYuc
Part 8 http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=endscreen&NR=1&v=JZFeA-INyV4 (Part 8 does include lots of nude artwork depicting Adam and Eve from about 00:32-04:15. You may want to minimize the screen and just listen.  Also footage of a Lion attacking a Wildebeast which might be too graphic for young or sensitive children - you could minimize when the lions start stalking at about 07:45 and continue to listen until this part is past- about 08:12).
Part 9 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pRlL_0rTgsM&feature=related
Part 10 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zKIYumIqvBQ&feature=related  (01:55-02:12 includes a piece of artwork of a person without clothes)
Part 11 http://www.youtube.com/watch?NR=1&feature=endscreen&v=5lhp86YCQUQ (Part 11 from minute 06:52-08:05 focuses on a drawing of Adam and Eve without clothes - if this bothers you, just minimize for that minute....)
Part 12 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vJXb2H4J268&feature=related


The following are short biographical sketches of Franz Joseph Haydn's life:
Composer Franz Joseph Haydn
8Notes Franz Joseph Haydn
Wikipedia Hanz Joseph Haydn


Phillis Wheatley had a beautiful and humble attitude toward what God had brought into her life, seeing the gift through the pain - 



On Being Brought from Africa to America

'Twas mercy brought me from my Pagan land,
Taught my benighted soul to understand
That there's a God, that there's a Saviour too:
Once I redemption neither sought nor knew.
Some view our sable race with scornful eye,
"Their colour is a diabolic die."
Remember, Christians, Negro's, black as Cain,
May be refin'd, and join th' angelic train.