Introduction and Welcome

Welcome to All Things Bright and Beautiful. If you are new to this site, I would recommend that you read my very first entry - which is an introduction and welcome to this blog. You can view it here

Friday, October 31, 2014

Ivan Aivasovsky, Aaraon Copland - Billy the Kid, Carl Sandburg - Bath

Looking for this week's painting, I came upon this interesting biographical sketch about the life and character of Ivan Aivasovsky.
There are seven pages of images if you click at the top of the page there on one of the numbers following the "image galleries".  You may like paintings other than the ones I have chosen to share with your children.  There are lots of details to study in this painting as well as wonderful colors.  Notice how the warm yellows and oranges are on the left on the top and on the right on the bottom and the wonderful cool blue greens are on the right on top and the left on the bottom - wonderful contrast!


Aivazovsky's painting

Today part 3 of Billy the Kid by Aaron Copland. 
I can't say I'm really enjoying his music, but my children have been more open minded about it....

An interesting poem today by Carl Sandburg about the affect of beautiful music on the soul - and here is a link to a Tchaikovsky violin concerto played by Mischa Elman

A man saw the whole world as a grinning skull and cross-bones. The rose flesh of life shriveled from all faces. Nothing counts. Everything is a fake. Dust to dust and ashes to ashes and then an old darkness and a useless silence. So he saw it all. Then he went to a Mischa Elman concert. Two hours waves of sound beat on his eardrums. Music washed something or other inside him. Music broke down and rebuilt something or other in his head and heart. He joined in five encores for the young Russian Jew with the fiddle. When he got outside his heels hit the sidewalk a new way. He was the same man in the same world as before. Only there was a singing fire and a climb of roses everlastingly over the world he looked on.

Thursday, October 23, 2014

Ivan Aivazovsky - Little Russian Oxcart in Winter, Aaron Copland - Billy the Kid part 2, Carl Sandburg - Child

Most of Ivan Aivazovsky's works are ships at sea, but, though it's not the first thing you notice, this painting also includes water in the little brook running along the right side.  
File:Ivan Constantinovich Aivazovsky - Little Russian Ox Cart in Winter.JPG
Little Russian Oxcart in Winter
Billy the Kid Part 2 by Aaron Copland.  We listened to part 1 last week and will have part 3 next week.

Child by Carl Sandburg
The young child, Christ, is straight and wise 
And asks questions of the old men, questions 
Found under running water for all children 
And found under shadows thrown on still waters 
By tall trees looking downward, old and gnarled.
Found to the eyes of children alone, untold, 
Singing a low song in the loneliness. 
And the young child, Christ, goes on asking 
And the old men answer nothing and only know love 
For the young child. Christ, straight and wise. 

Wednesday, October 15, 2014

Ivan Aivasovsky - Chains of Caucasus Mountains, Aaron Copland - Billy the Kid, Carl Sandburg - At a Window

I love the colors in this painting by Ivan Aivasovsky.

Chains of Caucasus Mountains

"Billy the Kid"Part 1 by Aaron Copland 

This thought-provoking poem today by Carl Sandburg  - "At a Window"


Give me hunger,
O you gods that sit and give
The world its orders.
Give me hunger, pain and want,
Shut me out with shame and failure
From your doors of gold and fame,
Give me your shabbiest, weariest hunger!

But leave me a little love,
A voice to speak to me in the day end,
A hand to touch me in the dark room
Breaking the long loneliness.
In the dusk of day-shapes
Blurring the sunset,
One little wandering, western star
Thrust out from the changing shores of shadow.
Let me go to the window,
Watch there the day-shapes of dusk
And wait and know the coming
Of a little love.

Thursday, October 9, 2014

Ivan Aivazovsky - Ship Twelve Apostles, Aaron Copland - Fanfare for the Common Man, Carl Sandburg - A Father to His Son

Another wonderful seascape by Ivan Aivazovsky. I like the blues and greens against the pink and peach and the outline of the full moon still in the sky as the sun comes up or perhaps as it sets. The ships are interesting, too.  Amazing motion in the sea with foam and still reflecting the colorful sky. 

Ship Twelve Apostles

 

Aaron Copland - Fanfare for the Common Man


Lots to think about in today's poem by
Carl Sandburg


A Father to His Son
 
A father sees his son nearing manhood.
What shall he tell that son?
'Life is hard; be steel; be a rock.'
And this might stand him for the storms
and serve him for humdrum monotony
and guide him among sudden betrayals
and tighten him for slack moments.
'Life is a soft loam; be gentle; go easy.'
And this too might serve him.
Brutes have been gentled where lashes failed.
The growth of a frail flower in a path up
has sometimes shattered and split a rock.
A tough will counts. So does desire.
So does a rich soft wanting.
Without rich wanting nothing arrives.
Tell him too much money has killed men
and left them dead years before burial:
the quest of lucre beyond a few easy needs
has twisted good enough men
sometimes into dry thwarted worms.
Tell him time as a stuff can be wasted.
Tell him to be a fool every so often
and to have no shame over having been a fool
yet learning something out of every folly
hoping to repeat none of the cheap follies
thus arriving at intimate understanding
of a world numbering many fools.
Tell him to be alone often and get at himself
and above all tell himself no lies about himself
whatever the white lies and protective fronts
he may use against other people.
Tell him solitude is creative if he is strong
and the final decisions are made in silent rooms.
Tell him to be different from other people
if it comes natural and easy being different.
Let him have lazy days seeking his deeper motives.
Let him seek deep for where he is born natural.
Then he may understand Shakespeare
and the Wright brothers, Pasteur, Pavlov,
Michael Faraday and free imaginations
Bringing changes into a world resenting change.
He will be lonely enough
to have time for the work
he knows as his own.

Thursday, October 2, 2014

Ivan Aivazovsky - The Ninth Wave, Aaron Copeland - Concerto for Clarinet and String Orchestra, Carl Sandburg - Autumn Movement

Another wonderful seascape by Ivan Aivazovsky -
"It depicts a sea after a night storm and people facing death attempting to save themselves by clinging to debris from a wrecked ship.
The painting has warm tones in which the sea appears to be not so menacing and giving a chance for the people to survive.
This painting is often called "the most beautiful painting in Russia.  
Both English and Russian titles refer to the nautical tradition that waves grow larger and larger in a series up to the largest wave, the ninth (or tenth) wave, at which point the series starts again." From Wikipedia's entry 'The Ninth Wave'.
seems almost like you can see light through the waves

File:Hovhannes Aivazovsky - The Ninth Wave - Google Art Project.jpg


Aaron Copeland
James Day interviews Aaron Copeland - Aaron Copeland talking about his life and his music.

Concerto for Clarinet and String Orchestra 


Fall used to be my favorite time of year but the older I get the more I feel the sadness of coming winter and how quickly the color and beauty pass.  This poem captures that sadness.
 
Autumn Movement by Carl Sandburg

I cried over beautiful things knowing no beautiful thing lasts.

The field of cornflower yellow is a scarf at the neck of the copper  

   sunburned woman, the mother of the year, the taker of seeds.

The northwest wind comes and the yellow is torn full of holes,
   new beautiful things come in the first spit of snow on the northwest wind,
   and the old things go, not one lasts.

Thursday, September 25, 2014

Ivan Aivazovsky - the Shipwreck, Aaron Copeland - Hoedown, Carl Sandburg - Arithmetic

Several of you have asked for an index to artists and composers.  I'm not sure how to go about that other than suggesting that you use the search button if you are looking for a particular artist, poet or composer.  You can just type in the last name and it should list the possible posts ( You may need to enable the no-script if the search button isn't working for you.  Just right click.) Or you can look through the Blog Archive list, click by year and then by date.  Sometimes I've been good about listing them all in the title, sometimes I've forgotten, but since artists, composers and poets have all been featured for multiple weeks, you should be able to find them listed in the title for one of the weeks.  If someone knows of a better way to catalog and display them I'm open to learning how to add that.... you can contact me at allthingsbrightandbeautifulblo@gmail.com.

 This week another wonderful painting by Ivan Aivazovsky - The Shipwreck.  Lots to look at in this painting.  The light and shadows are wonderfully portrayed, there are people to look at on the rock as well in the lifeboat.  I like how he lights up the parts of the painting he wants you to focus on. You can see it a bit larger here at Wikiart.   I love the pastel colors in the wave!
http://uploads4.wikiart.org/images/ivan-aivazovsky/the-shipwreck-1876.jpg


Aaron Copeland - Hoedown from Rodeo.  This piece of music has a lot of energy in it.  I can't say I really enjoy it, but my daughter said she likes it because it's "hyper".  

Carl Sandburg's Arithmetic is a fun poem about numbers

Arithmetic

 

Arithmetic is where numbers fly like pigeons in and out of your
    head.
Arithmetic tell you how many you lose or win if you know how
    many you had before you lost or won.
Arithmetic is seven eleven all good children go to heaven -- or five
    six bundle of sticks.
Arithmetic is numbers you squeeze from your head to your hand
    to your pencil to your paper till you get the answer.
Arithmetic is where the answer is right and everything is nice and
    you can look out of the window and see the blue sky -- or the
    answer is wrong and you have to start all over and try again
    and see how it comes out this time.
If you take a number and double it and double it again and then
    double it a few more times, the number gets bigger and bigger
    and goes higher and higher and only arithmetic can tell you
    what the number is when you decide to quit doubling.
Arithmetic is where you have to multiply -- and you carry the
    multiplication table in your head and hope you won't lose it.
If you have two animal crackers, one good and one bad, and you
    eat one and a striped zebra with streaks all over him eats the
    other, how many animal crackers will you have if somebody
    offers you five six seven and you say No no no and you say
    Nay nay nay and you say Nix nix nix?
If you ask your mother for one fried egg for breakfast and she
    gives you two fried eggs and you eat both of them, who is
    better in arithmetic, you or your mother?



Thursday, September 18, 2014

Ivan Aivasovsky - Fisherman on the Coast of the Sea, Aaron Copland - Symphony for Organ and Orchestra, Carl Sandburg - Monotone

Fisherman on the Coast of the Sea, by Ivan Aivasovsky.  I like the sun shining behind the clouds and through the waves.  You almost feel like you shouldn't look at the sun - it's too bright.  The aqua colors in the waves are so lovely!!  What story do you think this painting tells?




The following link will give you a large clear picture of this painting:Fisherman on the Coast of the Sea - Ivan Aivasovsky

Aaron Copland - Symphony for Organ and Orchestra 
I'm not very familiar with Aaron Copland's music and I'm finding myself with mixed feelings about it - it feels a bit new age and unsettling to me.  How about you - how does his music make you feel?  It almost feels like it could be out of a movie, maybe even in a bit of a spooky scene sometimes and then it turns playful.  It doesn't feel confident and resolving like Bach, Beethoven or Haydn. It makes me feel a bit edgy and unsettled - how about you?

Beautiful words by Carl Sandburg

             Monotone

  The monotone of the rain is beautiful,
and the sudden rise and slow relapse
Of the long multitudinous rain.

  The sun on the hills is beautiful,
Or a captured sunset sea-flung,
Bannered with fire and gold.